Hit the shuttle toward the back line. With some players you can watch their racket. Hit a simple short shot.


I've included a few examples for you at the bottom of this page to help you get started. When we look at the mechanics of playing a shot , the arm technique also varies considerably. It' s for this reason that Badminton training should be approached completely differently. This means using training drills and exercises that not only improve both technique and co-ordination but also increase speed, strength and endurance in the muscles and body systems used.

Click here to find out more - Badminton flexibility. Badminton Training Tip 2 - A totally different way to strengthen your hamstrings, so you can move quickly across court and lunge easily to reach low shots wherever they're played.

Click here to find out more - Badminton strength. Badminton Training Tip 3 - Strengthen the muscles of the forearms so you have more control and power in every shot. Click here to find out more - Badminton power. Click here to find out more - Badminton fitness tips. Click here to find out more - Badminton injury prevention. Whether you're playing singles or doubles, the short serve will catch your opponent off guard.

He won't be expecting it, and may not be able to run up to return the serve in time. To hit the short serve, you shouldn't just hit the shuttle really lightly, or it will fall on your side of the court.

Instead, hit it at a higher contact point and drop it closer to the racket instead of in front of the racket. Practice the long serve in singles. In singles, hitting a long serve all the way to the back of the service line will throw your opponent off guard. He may be standing in front of the shuttle and can miss it completely, or he may not have enough power to return it. To hit a longer serve, let the shuttle fall in front of you as you swing your racket further back almost to your shoulder level so you generate more momentum before you swing forward and hit the shuttle.

Understand your opponent's game. When you're playing a new opponent, whether it's at a competition or during a friendly game at a family outing, you should assess your opponent's game even while you're warming up.

You should look for a few main things: Make your opponent move around the court. Don't hit all of your shots to the same location of the court of your opponent will be able to predict your next move every time. Instead, mix things up by hitting a drop shot followed by a shot to the baseline, or by moving your opponent from the right to the left side of the court.

Moving from the front to the back of the court is particularly tricky unless your opponent has very nimble feet. Shoot toward your opponent's backhand.

Many players are weaker on the backhand side, so try shooting toward your opponent's backhand and see if this makes your opponent return less shots.

If so, continue to exploit your opponent's backhand. Hit a simple short shot. When you're up at the net, simply hit the shuttle short, just barely over to your opponent's side. This will make your opponent run and will catch him off guard. This is a great technique if your opponent is positioned near the back line. If your opponent knows that you are going to do a short shot, you need to flick the shuttle over the opponent or to another side and if you didn't do this, your opponent will fly the shuttle near the back line.

Change the direction of the shuttle. If your opponent hits the shuttle straight at you, hit the shuttle in a different direction instead of hitting it right back at your opponent, where he will expect it to go. This will work especially well if the shuttle has generated a lot of momentum. If you're quick on your feet, you can change the direction of the shuttle and not give your opponent enough time to react to a fast-moving shuttle. Hit a drop shot followed by a shot to the back of the court.

If you have mastered the drop shot, then use it to make your opponent run all the way to the front of the court. Then return the next shot all the way to the back of the court. Not only will this force your opponent to be quick on his feet, but it will also catch him off guard. This is also a great way to tire your opponent. Make your opponent play your style of game. If you like staying near the net, serve short, hit drop shots, and do whatever you can to make sure that your opponent can't hit the shuttle to the back line.

If you're more comfortable at the back line, then serve long and hit speedy long shots so your opponent doesn't have a chance to move you toward the net. Make the opponent lose all control as you play your style of game and maximize your strengths.

Slice your net shots. This will make the shuttle spin and fall in an unpredictable direction. To slice your net shot, start the forward motion as you normally would, and then move the racket inward as you slice the racket perpendicular to the center of the birdie. Your opponent will be expecting you to hit the birdie directly forward, while it will actually spin cross court. Slice your drop shots.

To do this, slice the racket, or move it perpendicularly over the center of the shuttle when it's in the air. This will make the shuttle lose much of its momentum and quickly fall on the opponent's side near the net. Smashing is when you hit the shuttle with all of your strength at the top of its arc. Point your free hand at the shuttle to keep track of its path, and then swing the racket over your head, hitting the center of the birdie and smashing it down into the opponent's court.

This is similar to serving in tennis. When you're smashing the shuttle, aim is just as important as strength. Don't just blindly hit the shuttle as hard as you can -- you should try to aim it either as far away from your opponent as possible or right at your opponent's body so he will be caught off guard.

Jump before you smash the shuttle. Once you've mastered the standard smash, you can practice jumping up as you smash the shuttle. This will give you even more momentum and will make the shuttle fall into your opponent's court even faster. Just jump up a foot or two, aiming your chest and body in the direction that you want the shuttle to go, and smash it at the center of its arc.

Don't smash the shuttle every time. The smash should be used at a time when the shuttle is high in the air and you have plenty of time to approach -- it should end the point in your favor. If you smash the shuttle at every opportunity, you will tire your arms and will risk smashing it into the net at inopportune moments.

Always plan your next move. A beginning player is just happy when he hits the shuttle over the net. An advanced player understands that a good game of badminton is like a game of chess -- you should always position your shot wisely so that you move your opponent to the exact place where you want him to be so you can hit the following shot.

Always plan your next move and always think one step ahead of your opponent. Usually, if your opponent hits a smash directly at you, instinctively you will try to hit it back in the same position, which will most likely make the shuttle hit the net. Instead, quickly step out of the way and hit the shuttle side-on, this will reduce the risk of hitting the net and also defend you against the smash. Not Helpful 63 Helpful Take deep breaths, and try not to think about the negative.

Don't worry about winning the round, just focus on playing your best. The calmer you are, the better you'll play and the more it will unnerve your opponent. Not Helpful 22 Helpful Start by practicing with parents, relatives and close friends. Then, when you feel like you've got some skill, start going to badminton courses.

It doesn't matter if you are slow at first; your speed will improve with proficiency. Not Helpful 25 Helpful Try to keep the opponent off-guard with drop shots and clears to the back of the court, and don't do high shots that would allow time to prepare a smash. Always keep your opponent moving and off-balance. Not Helpful 21 Helpful If you would like to be truly tournament-tier level, then you will have to practice at least a couple of hours each day.

Your practice can include endurance strength training along with badminton practice. Not Helpful 28 Helpful Hold the racket loose, but still tightly enough so that it doesn't fall out of your hands. Place your fingers so that the space between your thumb and your index finger forms a mix between a "U" and a "V".

Not Helpful 58 Helpful Use the thumb and index finger, with the other three fingers below the thumb and the index finger. Make the hold tight especially when it's backhand. Not Helpful 13 Helpful There is a different kind of footwork for each and every shot.

For example, there is a move called chasing. Also, always make sure you return to the center of the court. Not Helpful 2 Helpful There's no true way to predict where your opponent will return the shot, but there are some hints.

Look for clues such as where their body is facing. Most players will turn their body towards where they'll hit to. With some players you can watch their racket. For example, a player may draw their racket backwards if they're going to clear a drop, whereas if they were to drop, they wouldn't draw. At more advanced levels, these clues will get less obvious or may even be red herrings, but it's a good start. Not Helpful 35 Helpful What would be the best kind of shoes to wear for badminton to keep my knees from hurting?

To stop your feet from hurting on a hard court, invest in some good shoes. Go to your local sports shoe store, ask for a "cross trainer" shoe or a "court" shoe with extra support. Do not buy a "running shoe" for badminton as these types of shoes offer little support and do not work well on a hard court surface. Not Helpful 45 Helpful Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. Already answered Not a question Bad question Other.