Boxing Star: Top Tips, Walkthrough, Cheats, and Strategy Guide

Breathe out when you punch and always look at your target when you punch. Learn to keep your eyes open during the heat of the battle! If anything, the hand itself should be the last thing you should be looking for. The double-end bag keeps their eyes sharp and senses alert. The Secret to Developing Fighting Reflexes

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Green beats, yellow, yellow beats, purple, and purple beats blue. By simply having the stance with the advantage equipped, ALL of your attacks will deal increased damage. Also, while you can mix and match skills freely, it is best to stick to one attribute. For example, if you equip a blue stance and blue skills, you will activate a synergy bonus and your skills will be enhanced.

The four sponsorship each have their own unique bonuses that has a chance to activate depending on how much of their brand you have acquired. Keep fighting and winning package deliveries to get more gear. Do note that you do NOT need to actually have the gear in your inventory for it to count towards sponsorship progress.

Once you get it for the first time, it is marked and counted towards your progress — you may use it for upgrade purposes if you wish. If you have any other tips or tricks to share, let us know in the comments below! Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

How to increase stemina? Or how to upgrade stemina? How to equip sponsors? I have gear but it still wont let me equip them. How can i upgrade special attacks like hadouken? My name is Mendokuse on the game. I have mine set to all jab and try and upgrade your jab gloves as best u can. In the event that both fighters gain equal scores from the judges, the fight is considered a draw-what in other sports would be referred to as a tie- professional boxing.

In Olympic boxing, because a winner must be declared, in the case of a draw - the judges use technical criteria to choose the most deserving winner of the bout. While humans have fought in hand-to-hand combat since the dawn of human history, the earliest evidence of fist-fighting sporting contests date back to the ancient Middle East in the 3rd and 2nd millennia BCE. The earliest known depiction of boxing comes from a Sumerian relief in Iraq from the 3rd millennium BCE. In Ancient Greece boxing was a well developed sport and enjoyed consistent popularity.

In Olympic terms, it was first introduced in the 23rd Olympiad , BC. The boxers would wind leather thongs around their hands in order to protect themselves. There were no rounds and boxers fought until one of them acknowledged defeat or could not continue.

Weight categories were not used, which meant heavyweights had a tendency to dominate. The style of boxing practiced typically featured an advanced left leg stance, with the left arm semi-extended as a guard, in addition to being used for striking, and with the right arm drawn back ready to strike.

It was the head of the opponent which was primarily targeted, and there is little evidence to suggest that targeting the body was common. Boxing was a popular spectator sport in Ancient Rome. Eventually harder leather was used and the thong soon became a weapon.

The Romans even introduced metal studs to the thongs to make the cestus. Fighting events were held at Roman Amphitheatres. The Roman form of boxing was often a fight until death to please the spectators who gathered at such events. However, especially in later times, purchased slaves and trained combat performers were valuable commodities, and their lives were not given up without due consideration.

Often slaves were used against one another in a circle marked on the floor. This is where the term ring came from. In AD , during the Roman gladiator period, boxing was abolished due to excessive brutality. It was not until the late 16th century that boxing re-surfaced in London.

Records of Classical boxing activity disappeared after the fall of the Western Roman Empire when the wearing of weapons became common once again and interest in fighting with the fists waned. However, there are detailed records of various fist-fighting sports that were maintained in different cities and provinces of Italy between the 12th and 17th centuries.

As the wearing of swords became less common, there was renewed interest in fencing with the fists. The sport would later resurface in England during the early 16th century in the form of bare-knuckle boxing sometimes referred to as prizefighting. The first documented account of a bare-knuckle fight in England appeared in in the London Protestant Mercury , and the first English bare-knuckle champion was James Figg in This earliest form of modern boxing was very different.

Figg's time, in addition to fist fighting, also contained fencing and cudgeling. On 6 January , the first recorded boxing match took place in Britain when Christopher Monck , 2nd Duke of Albemarle and later Lieutenant Governor of Jamaica engineered a bout between his butler and his butcher with the latter winning the prize.

Early fighting had no written rules. There were no weight divisions or round limits, and no referee. In general, it was extremely chaotic. An early article on boxing was published in Nottingham, , by Sir Thomas Parkyns , a successful Wrestler from Bunny, Nottinghamshire , who had practised the techniques he described. The article, a single page in his manual of wrestling and fencing, Progymnasmata: The inn-play, or Cornish-hugg wrestler , described a system of headbutting, punching, eye-gouging, chokes, and hard throws, not recognized in boxing today.

The first boxing rules, called the Broughton's rules, were introduced by champion Jack Broughton in to protect fighters in the ring where deaths sometimes occurred.

Hitting a downed fighter and grasping below the waist were prohibited. Broughton encouraged the use of 'mufflers', a form of padded bandage or mitten, to be used in 'jousting' or sparring sessions in training, and in exhibition matches. These rules did allow the fighters an advantage not enjoyed by today's boxers; they permitted the fighter to drop to one knee to end the round and begin the second count at any time.

Thus a fighter realizing he was in trouble had an opportunity to recover. However, this was considered "unmanly" [7] and was frequently disallowed by additional rules negotiated by the Seconds of the Boxers.

Intentionally going down in modern boxing will cause the recovering fighter to lose points in the scoring system. Furthermore, as the contestants did not have heavy leather gloves and wristwraps to protect their hands, they used different punching technique to preserve their hands because the head was a common target to hit full out.

The London Prize Ring Rules introduced measures that remain in effect for professional boxing to this day, such as outlawing butting, gouging, scratching, kicking, hitting a man while down, holding the ropes, and using resin, stones or hard objects in the hands, and biting. The rules were published under the patronage of the Marquess of Queensberry , whose name has always been associated with them.

There were twelve rules in all, and they specified that fights should be "a fair stand-up boxing match" in a foot-square or similar ring. Rounds were three minutes with one-minute rest intervals between rounds. Each fighter was given a ten-second count if he was knocked down, and wrestling was banned. The introduction of gloves of "fair-size" also changed the nature of the bouts.

An average pair of boxing gloves resembles a bloated pair of mittens and are laced up around the wrists. As a result of their introduction, bouts became longer and more strategic with greater importance attached to defensive maneuvers such as slipping, bobbing, countering and angling.

Because less defensive emphasis was placed on the use of the forearms and more on the gloves, the classical forearms outwards, torso leaning back stance of the bare knuckle boxer was modified to a more modern stance in which the torso is tilted forward and the hands are held closer to the face. Through the late nineteenth century, the martial art of boxing or prizefighting was primarily a sport of dubious legitimacy.

Outlawed in England and much of the United States, prizefights were often held at gambling venues and broken up by police. Still, throughout this period, there arose some notable bare knuckle champions who developed fairly sophisticated fighting tactics. The English case of R v. Coney in found that a bare-knuckle fight was an assault occasioning actual bodily harm , despite the consent of the participants. This marked the end of widespread public bare-knuckle contests in England.

The first instance of film censorship in the United States occurred in when several states banned the showing of prize fighting films from the state of Nevada, [16] where it was legal at the time. Throughout the early twentieth century, boxers struggled to achieve legitimacy. The sport rising from illegal venues and outlawed prize fighting has become one of the largest multibillion-dollar sports today.

A majority of young talent still comes from poverty-stricken areas around the world. Places like Mexico, Africa, South America, and Eastern Europe prove to be filled with young aspiring athletes who wish to become the future of boxing. Even in the U. According to Rubin, "boxing lost its appeal with the American middle class, and most of who boxes in modern America come from the streets and are street fighters".

The Marquess of Queensberry rules have been the general rules governing modern boxing since their publication in A boxing match typically consists of a determined number of three-minute rounds, a total of up to 9 to 12 rounds.

A minute is typically spent between each round with the fighters in their assigned corners receiving advice and attention from their coach and staff. The fight is controlled by a referee who works within the ring to judge and control the conduct of the fighters, rule on their ability to fight safely, count knocked-down fighters, and rule on fouls. Up to three judges are typically present at ringside to score the bout and assign points to the boxers, based on punches and elbows that connect, defense, knockdowns, hugging and other, more subjective, measures.

Because of the open-ended style of boxing judging, many fights have controversial results, in which one or both fighters believe they have been "robbed" or unfairly denied a victory. Each fighter has an assigned corner of the ring, where his or her coach, as well as one or more "seconds" may administer to the fighter at the beginning of the fight and between rounds.

Each boxer enters into the ring from their assigned corners at the beginning of each round and must cease fighting and return to their corner at the signalled end of each round.

A bout in which the predetermined number of rounds passes is decided by the judges, and is said to "go the distance". The fighter with the higher score at the end of the fight is ruled the winner. With three judges, unanimous and split decisions are possible, as are draws.

A boxer may win the bout before a decision is reached through a knock-out; such bouts are said to have ended "inside the distance". If a fighter is knocked down during the fight, determined by whether the boxer touches the canvas floor of the ring with any part of their body other than the feet as a result of the opponent's punch and not a slip, as determined by the referee, the referee begins counting until the fighter returns to his or her feet and can continue.

Some jurisdictions require the referee to count to eight regardless of if the fighter gets up before. Should the referee count to ten, then the knocked-down boxer is ruled "knocked out" whether unconscious or not and the other boxer is ruled the winner by knockout KO. A "technical knock-out" TKO is possible as well, and is ruled by the referee, fight doctor, or a fighter's corner if a fighter is unable to safely continue to fight, based upon injuries or being judged unable to effectively defend themselves.

Many jurisdictions and sanctioning agencies also have a "three-knockdown rule", in which three knockdowns in a given round result in a TKO. A TKO is considered a knockout in a fighter's record. A "standing eight" count rule may also be in effect. This gives the referee the right to step in and administer a count of eight to a fighter that he or she feels may be in danger, even if no knockdown has taken place.

After counting the referee will observe the fighter, and decide if he or she is fit to continue. For scoring purposes, a standing eight count is treated as a knockdown. In general, boxers are prohibited from hitting below the belt, holding, tripping, pushing, biting, or spitting. The boxer's shorts are raised so the opponent is not allowed to hit to the groin area with intent to cause pain or injury. Failure to abide by the former may result in a foul.

They also are prohibited from kicking, head-butting, or hitting with any part of the arm other than the knuckles of a closed fist including hitting with the elbow, shoulder or forearm, as well as with open gloves, the wrist, the inside, back or side of the hand. They are prohibited as well from hitting the back, back of the head or neck called a "rabbit-punch" or the kidneys. They are prohibited from holding the ropes for support when punching, holding an opponent while punching, or ducking below the belt of their opponent dropping below the waist of your opponent, no matter the distance between.

If a "clinch" — a defensive move in which a boxer wraps his or her opponents arms and holds on to create a pause — is broken by the referee, each fighter must take a full step back before punching again alternatively, the referee may direct the fighters to "punch out" of the clinch.

When a boxer is knocked down, the other boxer must immediately cease fighting and move to the furthest neutral corner of the ring until the referee has either ruled a knockout or called for the fight to continue. Violations of these rules may be ruled "fouls" by the referee, who may issue warnings, deduct points, or disqualify an offending boxer, causing an automatic loss, depending on the seriousness and intentionality of the foul.

An intentional foul that causes injury that prevents a fight from continuing usually causes the boxer who committed it to be disqualified. A fighter who suffers an accidental low-blow may be given up to five minutes to recover, after which they may be ruled knocked out if they are unable to continue. Accidental fouls that cause injury ending a bout may lead to a "no contest" result, or else cause the fight to go to a decision if enough rounds typically four or more, or at least three in a four-round fight have passed.

Unheard of in the modern era, but common during the early 20th Century in North America, a "newspaper decision NWS " might be made after a no decision bout had ended. A "no decision" bout occurred when, by law or by pre-arrangement of the fighters, if both boxers were still standing at the fight's conclusion and there was no knockout, no official decision was rendered and neither boxer was declared the winner.

But this did not prevent the pool of ringside newspaper reporters from declaring a consensus result among themselves and printing a newspaper decision in their publications. Officially, however, a "no decision" bout resulted in neither boxer winning or losing. Boxing historians sometimes use these unofficial newspaper decisions in compiling fight records for illustrative purposes only. Often, media outlets covering a match will personally score the match, and post their scores as an independent sentence in their report.

Throughout the 17th to 19th centuries, boxing bouts were motivated by money , as the fighters competed for prize money , promoters controlled the gate, and spectators bet on the result. The modern Olympic movement revived interest in amateur sports, and amateur boxing became an Olympic sport in In their current form, Olympic and other amateur bouts are typically limited to three or four rounds, scoring is computed by points based on the number of clean blows landed, regardless of impact, and fighters wear protective headgear, reducing the number of injuries, knockdowns, and knockouts.

Professional boxing remains by far the most popular form of the sport globally, though amateur boxing is dominant in Cuba and some former Soviet republics. For most fighters, an amateur career, especially at the Olympics, serves to develop skills and gain experience in preparation for a professional career. Western boxers typically participate in one Olympics and then turn pro, Cubans and other socialist countries have an opportunity to collect multiple medals.

Amateur boxing may be found at the collegiate level, at the Olympic Games and Commonwealth Games , and in many other venues sanctioned by amateur boxing associations.

Amateur boxing has a point scoring system that measures the number of clean blows landed rather than physical damage. Bouts consist of three rounds of three minutes in the Olympic and Commonwealth Games, and three rounds of three minutes in a national ABA Amateur Boxing Association bout, each with a one-minute interval between rounds. Competitors wear protective headgear and gloves with a white strip or circle across the knuckle.

There are cases however, where white ended gloves are not required but any solid color may be worn. The white end just is a way to make it easier for judges to score clean hits. Each competitor must have their hands properly wrapped, pre-fight, for added protection on their hands and for added cushion under the gloves. My advice to you, spend less time on the heavy bag and more time on the double-end bag. Some kids are just so natural at this stuff. I spent the following 2 days practicing it at home.

This are the best tips i have ever found and witnessed online, this tips are the secrets of winning in boxing. I thought it was just me, haha! When you talk about keeping your eyes on your opponent all the time, where exactly i should be looking at?

Into his eyes, ears, shoulders? What gives away your opponents intentions? Newbie I look at their hands or chest area. That way, I can look at which hand is coming because I like to weave and slip a lot , and remind myself of the distance. Looking at their eyes may give you an idea of either a body shot or a head shot, but try not to look there all the time since it makes it harder to react to punches.

Paul — just look forward. Just look forward and be ready for any sudden movement whether it be from the hand, the head, or even the foot. Very clear written, so easy to understand for foreign people. You are a very smart Guy. Do you have a tip for me? How can i get faster in this so that the movement becames very fluent? My problem is that it takes to much time when i use my jab and after this the punch.

The twist When i try to do it fast, i loose my right balance. And i am open for my opponent. The technique is actually very simple. But I have had the opportunity to work with a real good coachhe took his time out and taught me everything I know. But Chris many this can. Step into ur punch. And throw multiple jabbs go for the body head anywhere u can set up ur apponet. When u got him where u feel u can land that lucky shot give it to him.

I say on my toes but keep my weight balanced. And when u get the chance to hit with the hard shot twist at the hips. I am a 17year old girl who boxes with her boyfriend and need to learn more haha! I am going for my licence soon at 23 simply by watching the effects of feedback and training strategy from other fighters its like my own lil jeet kun do experience.

Give it a try. Johnny, For head movement i was thinking about not just moving my head in rhythm but rather in a motion so im moving just outside his right hand and left hand, to my opponent im just moving my head but he might not realize im placing it in a way to if he throws a straight it will miss because its off the punching line.

Is that a good idea? Also, you want to keep your head far from where you want it to go. If you want to move your head to the left, then bait with it on the right. It goes like this: Matt, I understood your theory perfectly. Imagine a runner only taking shallow breaths instead of deep breaths, so terribly inefficient. Look at those karate guys that breathe really deep when they break the boards.

In any case, I suggest that you try your theory anyway and see how well it works. Try it at full-sprint, jogging pace, on the heavy bag, and also during sparring. Thanks for your replay Johnny! Of course that taking shallow breaths is bad because it gives us less oxygen. Maximum amount of additional air that can be inspired from the end of a normal inspiration.

The maximum volume of additional air that can be expired from the end of a normal expiration. The volume of air remaining in the lung after a maximal expiration. This is the only lung volume which cannot be measured with a spirometer.

And another information about breathing that might be useful is that naturally our inhale and exhale rate must be 1: So the next time you do some push-ups try to inhale with one push-up and exhale on the next two etc. Either way, I stand by my original opinion. You have to exhale sharply to contract your muscles explosively. Your breathing theory would be useful in a marathon where athletes have all the time to themselves to build up the perfect breathing rhythm.

Punches are thrown with short rapid exhalations of air. As soon as we get a chance to breathe, we replenish the air volume right away.

Anytime that we breathe using ERV, it is because the fight forces us and there is no other way. Ultimately, boxers will have to breathe the way the fight is forced upon them. Your breathing interval theory is valid. The general principle is that your nose inhales slowly to breathe deeply and then the mouth can exhale slowly in spurts.

You exhale through the mouth to slow down the air, which would then make exhales take longer than inhales. The reason why many guys breathe at 1: I actually held some platoon push-up records in the Army. All the fastest guys used the same breathing pattern: And just one more thing I just read your article about breathing and I agree with you Johnny, breathing trough the nose must be better because if you try to respect 1: Do I have to breathe as I go up or exhale!!! I wanted to improve the strength of my wrists!!

For pull-ups you exhale as you go up. As for running, you keep a steady breathing rhythm. Most fighters do roadwork days a week. Got a charity bout on , march 31 st and want this as a big part of my offence, great site!!!

You have to look forward. Like I mentioned before I box but not in the big times and when I was younger I got into fights and I learned to use periferals. I keep my ist up and head up. I box left and or right handed. So I stay far enough back I use my periferals and can see from his head to his toes. Do u think that could work to my advantage? Hi Johnny,, why should we never lean back? There will always be times when leaning back can be useful…for example: